Prensa The coalition agreement in Germany: winners, losers and the uncertain future of Merkel

SPD and CDU-CSU reached an agreement in order to build up a Government. Critical voices in the conservative alliance has been played down by the last events: new elections would pose a threat to recently resigned Schulz's party, whilst CDU has not presented itself as a clear alternative to the Merkelian leadership. The main question is how these events will affect the long-term German party system.

Prensa The Relentless Decline of Social Democracy in the West

Imagine a map of Europe showing which party of the Left or the Right heads the government. Twenty years ago, it would be almost wholly covered in red, the traditional color of European democratic socialism, not to be confused with “red for Republicans” in the United States. Today, following the bellwether elections in France and Germany, only five countries are inked in red, among them such giants as the tiny island of Malta.

Prensa The Fragility of Institutional Euro-scepticism

The dissolution of the Euro-sceptic group in the European Parliament EFDD (Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy), the spokesman of which is Nigel Farage, leader of Britain's UKIP (UK Independence Party) was communicated on Wednesday October 15th. The cause was Latvian MEP Iveta Grigule's exit from the group to join the ECR group (European Conservatives and Reformists). This excluded the EFDD of the benefits of being a distinct political group in Parliament by not complying with the requirement of national diversity, needing representatives of at least seven different countries.

Prensa Germany’s Grand Coalition: SPD and the Lessons of the Past

More than four months have elapsed since CDU/CSU and SPD formed a coalition in Germany. This time, the aim was to avoid the errors made by both parties in the previous coalition of 2005-2009, after Gerhard Schröder’s defeat and the election of Angela Merkel as Chancellor. The result of said coalition was not satisfactory to either party, but was especially harmful to SPD. The Social Democratic Party decreased by more than 11 points in the following 2009 election and CDU/CSU had to form a coalition with the Liberals to continue in office.

Prensa The coalition agreement in Germany: winners, losers and the uncertain future of Merkel

02.14.2018. SPD and CDU-CSU reached an agreement in order to build up a Government. Critical voices in the conservative alliance has been played down by the last events: new elections would pose a threat to recently resigned Schulz's party, whilst CDU has not presented itself as a clear alternative to the Merkelian leadership. The main question is how these events will affect the long-term German party system.

Prensa The Relentless Decline of Social Democracy in the West

10.17.2017. Imagine a map of Europe showing which party of the Left or the Right heads the government. Twenty years ago, it would be almost wholly covered in red, the traditional color of European democratic socialism, not to be confused with “red for Republicans” in the United States. Today, following the bellwether elections in France and Germany, only five countries are inked in red, among them such giants as the tiny island of Malta.

Prensa The Fragility of Institutional Euro-scepticism

10.24.2014. The dissolution of the Euro-sceptic group in the European Parliament EFDD (Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy), the spokesman of which is Nigel Farage, leader of Britain's UKIP (UK Independence Party) was communicated on Wednesday October 15th. The cause was Latvian MEP Iveta Grigule's exit from the group to join the ECR group (European Conservatives and Reformists). This excluded the EFDD of the benefits of being a distinct political group in Parliament by not complying with the requirement of national diversity, needing representatives of at least seven different countries.

Prensa Germany’s Grand Coalition: SPD and the Lessons of the Past

04.21.2014. More than four months have elapsed since CDU/CSU and SPD formed a coalition in Germany. This time, the aim was to avoid the errors made by both parties in the previous coalition of 2005-2009, after Gerhard Schröder’s defeat and the election of Angela Merkel as Chancellor. The result of said coalition was not satisfactory to either party, but was especially harmful to SPD. The Social Democratic Party decreased by more than 11 points in the following 2009 election and CDU/CSU had to form a coalition with the Liberals to continue in office.